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08/03/2013
Daily Express
By: Presswatch
Cheers! Red wine pills will beat killer diseases
US scientists have found conclusive evidence that a compound in red wine can protect against a host of chronic killer diseases. A new study has shown what the researchers consider to be "conclusive evidence" that resveratrol directly activates a protein that promotes health and longevity in animal models. Dr Simon Ridley, head of research at Alzheimer's Research UK, said: "There is still a way to go to know whether these results would translate into benefits in people."
 
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08/03/2013
Daily Express
By: Presswatch
Fish oil may hold key to beating flu
Akita University researchers believe that the have found a way to use fatty acids from fish to make a powerful new flu drug. New research has found that a compound derived from fats found in fish oils prevents death in mice infected with the influenza virus. And in a major breakthrough, it works even at advanced stages of the illness.
 
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08/03/2013
Daily Telegraph
By: Presswatch
Walking back to health after stroke
Taking a regular walk can help recovery from a stroke, a study shows. Walkers feel healthier, have better endurance and a lower resting heart rate, say researchers at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica. The report was published in the journal Stroke.
 
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08/03/2013
The Times
By: Presswatch
Drug-driving limits
Motorists may be able to drive with small amounts of cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy, ketamine and opiates in their bloodstream under proposals announced yesterday. A government-appointed panel has proposed limits for the most common illegal drugs, setting thresholds that are thought to impair driving ability. Ministers want a zero-tolerance approach to drug-driving and next year plan to make it illegal to drive under the influence of a range of illegal drugs. However, the issue is complicated by a range of prescription medicines which are deemed safe.
 
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08/03/2013
The Guardian
By: Presswatch
Number of people admitting to heavy drinking falls by a third
ONS figures report that the proportion of people saying they drank heavily or frequently fell between 2007 and 2011, with the proportion of men drinking on five or more days a week fell from 23% in 1998 to 16% in 2011 and that of women from 13% to 9%.
 
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08/03/2013
The Times
By: Presswatch
Mice given human brain cells are more intelligent
Transplanting human brain cells into the brains of mice makes them cleverer, scientists have shown. Professor Steven Goldman, a neurologist at the University of Rochester Medical Centre in New York State, said the work showed that our brains were "fundamentally different" from those of lower species. The latest findings strengthen the view that glial cells, which surround and support neurons in the brain, are an important part of the unique capabilities of the human brain. The discovery that glial cells can readily be integrated into an existing brain network could pave the way for new treatments of degenerative brain diseases. Conditions such as schizophrenia and Huntington's disease, thought to stem in part from defective glial cells, could be treated by injecting healthy cells into the brains of patients.
 
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08/03/2013
By: Presswatch
NHS and Health Sector News
The Independent reports that the National Health Service will press ahead with its planned rationalisation of children's heart surgery despite a High Court ruling that it had failed to consult fairly in a decision to shut a specialist unit in Leeds. The Guardian reports that the Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, is to claim that hospitals are putting lives at risk by "coasting", by which he means they meet key targets but never strive to provide the highest-quality care because of ingrained complacency. The Times reports that the people who run the NHS have lost sight of their moral purpose and need to remember that they exist to do good, according to the health service standards watchdog. Harry Cayton, head of the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care, believes that a return of old-fashioned moral concepts is needed in order to guide the NHS out of a malaise and rebuild public confidence after the Mid Staffs scandal.
 
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